Title Clerk Job Description

Title clerks prepare and process title documents to transfer ownership of property, typically vehicles or real estate. Mortgage companies, title companies, lawyers, and car dealerships hire title clerks for part- and full-time shifts during daytime weekday hours. Title clerks work in office environments, performing tasks for agents and lawyers who work in the office, but primarily report to the office manager. Some travel may be required for this job, as title clerks may hand-deliver documents to customers and government facilities.

 

Title Clerk Duties and Responsibilities

Daily duties for title clerks vary based on the number of titles that need to be transferred and the type of titles they work with on a regular basis. However, the core duties for title clerks are essentially the same in all offices:

Prepare Documents

Title clerks prepare tax and title documents to transfer ownership of property.

Submit Paperwork

Title clerks submit title documents to the appropriate government office, such as the Department of Motor Vehicles or the County Clerk’s Office.

Verify Funds

Title clerks verify that funds have been collected on sales before processing titles and verify the amount of money still owed.

Check Documents

Title clerks look over documents to ensure that all information is accurate and double-check important data such as names and addresses.

Answer Phones

Title clerks answer incoming phone calls and route calls to the appropriate person within the office.

Clerical Tasks

Title clerks perform general clerical tasks, such as filing, data entry, and copying.

Maintain Work Area

Title clerks keep their work areas clean and organized to maintain a professional appearance at all times.

Send Paperwork to Customers

Title clerks make copies of all relevant title paperwork, organize the documents, and send this packet to the customer. At times, this may require title clerks to travel outside the office to hand-deliver documents.

Answer Questions

Title clerks respond to questions from customers and explain the title transfer process to them.

 

Title Clerk Skills and Qualifications

Title clerks manage all title paperwork, answer customer questions, and verify the accuracy of legal title documents. Companies look for title clerks who have all the skills needed to perform this job:

  • Mathematics – to make calculations, verify figures, and collect payments from customers
  • Communication – to interact with customers and other staff members
  • Customer service – title clerks process paperwork for customers and answer their questions
  • Computer skills – to access digital files
  • Attention to detail – to ensure that all title and customer information is accurate
  • Data entry – to add customer and title information into forms

 

Title Clerk Education and Training

Title clerks are entry-level employees, so many companies do not have strict educational requirements for these professionals. Most employers require title clerks to have a high school diploma or equivalent, but formal education beyond this is not necessary. Because some travel is involved, many companies ask title clerks to also have a valid driver’s license with a clean driving record.

Because this is an entry-level position, title clerks typically receive training upon being hired. This training period varies by employer but usually lasts one to two weeks as title clerks learn how to perform their daily job duties. During training, title clerks work closely with an office manager or a senior staff member.

 

Title Clerk Salary and Outlook

General office clerks earned $31,500 median annual income, $15.14 hourly median income, in 2017. There were more than three million jobs for general office clerks in 2016, a number the Bureau of Labor Statistics expects to experience little or no change through 2026. Like title clerks, general office clerks have a high school education and perform many office tasks, including answering phones, filing, and performing data entry. PayScale data shows that title clerks earn $13.97 hourly income.

A majority of employers provide title clerks with basic benefits packages that include health insurance coverage. Additionally, some title clerks may receive dental and vision coverage. Paid vacation days and sick days are also typically provided to title clerks. Some employers offer additional job perks to title clerks, such as free parking.

 

Helpful Resources

Use these books and websites to find job openings for title clerks, learn career strategies, master workplace techniques, and stay up-to-date on important news:

American Land Title Association – Visit this website to find education resources, news updates, upcoming events, and business tools for title clerks and other professionals who work with titles.

Customer Service Skills for Success – Learn how to address real-world customer service issues with this book that provides information about skills for success, case study scenarios, and other customer service tips for all professionals who work with customers.

North American Title Company – Look for career opportunities, news updates, and title information resources at this website.

How To Do A Real Estate Title Search – Find out how to do a real estate title search with the helpful tips and tools in this book, a skill that all real estate title clerks need to know.

American Society of Administrative Professionals – View webinars, find certification programs, and look at resources for clerks and administrative professionals of all types at this website.

 

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