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Greeters meet and assist customers in a variety of settings, such as restaurants, car dealerships, banks, and supermarkets. They may also work at temporary events, such as festivals, trade shows, or conferences, where visitors may need assistance. This job is typically worked indoors, but some companies may prefer their greeters to work outside. This job involves providing sales information, answering customer inquiries, and keeping the work area tidy and safe for all customers and employees. Greeters should be professional and personable, with excellent customer service and communication skills.

Greeter Duties and Responsibilities

The type of organization a greeter works for will determine the exact duties they perform. Based on job listings we analyzed, a greeter’s duties typically involve:

Greet All Customers

Greeters provide visitors with directions and any information they require, ensuring that they’re greeted with courtesy every time. Strong customer service skills and the ability to stay calm under pressure or when dealing with a dissatisfied customer are vital to this aspect of the job.

Perform Housekeeping Duties

Greeters maintain their work area, performing housekeeping duties to ensure cleanliness and adhere to control and security policies. Keeping these areas, which are often business entrances, tidy helps customers feel comfortable and gives a positive first impression.

Provide Sales Information

Promoting sales to customers is a key part of a greeter’s job. They do this by handing out sales leaflets and flyers or by informing customers of deals and sales when they speak face to face.

Accept Payments

Greeters administer customer contracts for warranties and make sure that all orders are completed accurately. They also help their colleagues during busy periods, such as holidays, by completing sales transactions.

Manage Customer Queries

When customers have questions or need help, greeters assist them and provide optimal levels of customer service wherever possible. They analyze the customer’s requirements and help them find the best solution by directing them to the appropriate department.

Greeter Skills and Qualifications

Greeters have excellent communication, interpersonal, and teamwork skills, as well as high levels of patience and professionalism. Typically, employers require a high school diploma in addition to the following abilities:

Customer service – a key part of this job is speaking to members of the public, so excellent customer service skills are essential, as greeters are often the face of their company

Teamwork – greeters collaborate closely with the rest of the company’s employees, so it’s important that they’re able to work well with other people

Listening skills – greeters must understand customer queries and help them with anything they need, so good listening skills are essential

Patience – customers may sometimes be frustrated, confused, or angry, so it’s vital that greeters are able to remain calm, professional, and polite

Administrative skills – office skills (like completing paperwork) are often a part of this job, so some administrative experience is advantageous

Greeter Education and Training

The minimum requirement to become a greeter is a high school diploma, although some employers prefer applicants who have previous customer service or hospitality experience. Administrative experience is also beneficial to this position, as the job often involves completing paperwork and other office duties. Pursuing training in customer service or people skills can improve job prospects, but employers often provide on-the-job training to the right candidate.

Greeter Salary and Outlook

The median annual salary for greeters is nearly $26,000, according to PayScale. Greeters in the 10th percentile earn around $20,000 annually, while the highest paid earn close to $39,000 a year. Some companies offer packages that reach up to $2,000 from bonus structures. Around a third of all employers offer dental plans and medical insurance as part of their benefits package.

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Helpful Resources

We’ve collected some of the best resources to help you learn more about working as a greeter:

Introduction to Hospitality

greeters commonly work in the hospitality sector, and this book provides a great overview for industry newcomers. From restaurants and recreation venues to theme parks and clubs, the text thoroughly explores how these areas differ. It details career opportunities, trends, and insight from industry professionals

Be Our Guest: Perfecting the Art of Customer Service

this book from the Disney Institute is a fantastic reference guide for everything customer service, from being the face of a brand to providing an excellent customer experience

The Customer Rules: The 39 Essential Rules for Delivery Sensational Service

as a greeter, your goal is to provide every customer with outstanding service and a great first impression. This book provides 39 insights on this very topic, from why the customer always rules to gaining repeat business

Extra Mile: 500 Customer Service Tips for Success

happy customers stay loyal to the brands that provide them with great service, so greeters need to know how to keep their customers satisfied. This book has 500 ideas for achieving great customer service and encouraging brand loyalty again and again