Cashier Manager Job Description

Cashier managers supervise cashiers and audit daily reports. Typically working in grocery or department stores, cashier managers greet customers and answer any questions that they might have. Overlooking a team of cashiers, cashier managers motivate their teams and resolve conflicts when they arise. This position is typically offered full-time. Working early mornings, late nights, or on weekends is common for cashier managers. Those who are well-suited to this profession enjoy working within a team and have strong leadership skills.

 

Cashier Manager Duties and Responsibilities

Although the day-to-day responsibilities of cashier managers vary based on employer, these are some core duties and tasks associated with the role:

Supervise and Coordinate Cashiers

Cashier managers ensure that there are enough cashiers available at each shift. They supervise employees and make sure that customers are helped at a timely pace. When conflicts arise, cashier managers resolve any issues.

Train Employees

Tasked with hiring new employees, cashier managers train cashiers so that they understand the functions of their position. Cashier managers explain guidelines, train on proper cash handling techniques, and teach employees how to operate the cash register.

Balance Cash Registers at Shift Change

At the end of each cashier’s shift, cashier managers balance the cash register and check that the register reflects the accurate amount of cash that it should have.

Audit Daily Reports

Ensuring accurate entries, cashier managers audit daily reports. They approve overrides and voids, and they count cash for the entire day. Cashier managers organize paperwork and receipts after auditing balances.

Answer Customer Questions

When customers enter the store, cashier managers greet and welcome them. They provide stellar customer service while answering questions and responding to concerns or comments.

 

Cashier Manager Skills and Qualifications

Leading a group of cashiers, cashier managers develop a sense of teamwork and motivate their teams to perform well. They also have experience handling high-volume cash and financial transactions. In addition, the following skills and qualifications are essential to the job:

  • Mathematical Skills – Handling cash and working with different balances, cashier managers are proficient in mathematics. They know how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide, and they are comfortable working with numbers
  • Team Management – Cashier managers train and manage employees. They keep their employees motivated, and they hire new staff. When conflicts arise, cashier managers address employee concerns and respond appropriately
  • Cash Register Proficiency – Working with cash registers, cashier managers are proficient in operating cash register systems. They are comfortable using cash register systems to perform functions such as overriding and voiding transactions, editing prices, adding daily totals, and balancing the register
  • Money Handling – Cashier managers handle cash daily. They correctly identify bills and coins, and they know appropriate methods for counting change
  • Customer Service Skills – Greeting guests and answering questions, cashier managers provide great customer service to ensure customer satisfaction. Cashier managers maintain a friendly attitude while attending to customers’ needs

 

Cashier Manager Education and Training

The minimum educational requirement for cashier managers is a high school degree or GED. Most employers require two to three years of experience handling financial transactions. Cashier managers typically have prior experience using cash registers, and they also have strong people skills. For this position, on-the-job training is usually provided so that cashier managers know the guidelines and processes at their company.

 

Cashier Manager Salary and Outlook

According to Glassdoor and based on over 68,000 salaries, the median annual salary for cashier managers is $26,000. The lowest paid 10 percent in this field earn less than $22,000, while the highest paid 10 percent earn more than $33,000. Salary.com explains that cashier managers of grocery stores earn between $43,278 and $50,572 based on work experience and education.

Medical benefits are available for full-time employees, depending on the industry as well as employer.

 

Helpful Resources

Does a career as a cashier manager interest you? We’ve gathered some useful resources to help you learn more about this profession:

Cashier Live Blog – Cashier Live aims to streamline businesses and help increase sales and revenue. With helpful articles for professionals working in retail, this blog covers a wide range of topics including employee motivation, customer service, and POS software. With these tips, Cashier Live serves as a practical resource for those working in retail.

Build Your Dream Team – Cashier managers motivate their teams and offer guidance and leadership. Written by Candela Igelsias Chiesa, this book outlines ways to manage and lead a driven team. With helpful guides on planning goals, resolving conflicts, and preventing burnout, this book focuses on developing the mindset to become a great leader.

The Customer Rules – This book, written by Lee Cockerell who has over 40 years of experience working in the hospitality industry, contains 39 chapters on providing excellent customer service. Full of universal advice, this book not only discusses why customers always rule but also features the essential rules to follow when handling customers.

Gordon Tredgold Blog – Author Gordon Tredgold has over 20 years of experience running large programs and building successful teams. With this experience, he offers advice on how to effectively manage workers. His articles discuss topics such as increasing productivity, eliminating workplace conflict, developing practical skills, and increasing employee motivation.

Customer Service Training 101 – Written by Renee Evenson, this book discusses the importance of arming employees with the knowledge to find solutions when dealing with customers. Covering a variety of interactions such as face-to-face, phone, online, and self-service interactions, Customer Service Training 101 lists many different scenarios and addresses how they can best be solved. The book also contains assessments and examples to help readers develop trust, establish rapport, connect with customers, and confidently handle customer complaints.

 

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