Call Center Team Lead Job Description

Call center team leads work in fast-paced and often intense environments. Team leads may be employed in centers that represent various industries, from healthcare to manufacturing to retail. Based on the industry represented, call center team leads may work in 24-hour, seven-day week operations that require working evenings, weekends, and holidays. Therefore, this position requires schedule flexibility regarding both hours and shifts. These leaders make a huge contribution to their team and to the efficient and effective daily operations of the call center. Since the primary function of a call center is to take calls, the primary duties of a call center team lead are scheduling adequate coverage for call volume and ensuring calls are answered in a timely manner, that hold time is low, and that quality customer service is provided.

 

Call Center Team Lead Duties and Responsibilities

Depending upon the type of industry the call center team lead is employed in, call types may vary between inbound, outbound, or both. Call types may also include sales calls, troubleshooting, shipping issues, billing, order taking, service sign-up, or a combination. Regardless of the types of calls that come into or go out of the call center, team leaders are responsible for the core tasks listed below:

Employee Development

Call center team leads are responsible for their team members’ professional development from the time they’re hired until they leave the team. This includes new hire training, coaching, and performance reviews.

Oversee Schedules

It is important that there are enough call center agents available to handle the daily call volume. Team leads approve and schedule agents’ vacation requests, breaks, and lunch times based on this factor.

Audit Calls

Recorded calls are reviewed by team leads to identify opportunities for coaching. Agents are given feedback on ways to improve the customers’ call experience as well as kudos on providing excellent customer service.

Answer Calls

During peak periods, call center team leads take calls to help meet production and quality metrics. They also receive escalated calls to help with unresolved customer issues.

Prepare Reports

Call center team leads prepare attendance, production, and quality trend reports that they and upper management use in business decision-making.

 

Call Center Team Lead Skills and Qualifications

Employers prefer to hire call center team leads with at least a high school diploma and the following skills:

  • Interpersonal skills – call center team leads supervise and interact with agents who have various personality types and educational backgrounds, as well as customers from varying levels of society
  • Problem-solving skills – team leads are faced with customer complaints and multiple issues from team members and must be able to effectively resolve them
  • Leadership skills – call center team leads supervise a group of customer service representatives or agents that may range from a small team of 10 or less to a large team of 50 or more
  • Computer proficiency – multiple computer screens and various software is used to look up customer information, document calls, schedule agents, and generate reports
  • Troubleshooting – call center team leads frequently assist team members with minor technical issues related to their phone system or computer, but refer more complex issues to the IT department

 

Call Center Team Lead Education and Training

A high school diploma or GED is sufficient for most positions; however, customer service or call center experience is required. Many employers prefer one to three years of supervisory experience.

 

Call Center Team Lead Salary and Outlook

The median salary for call center team leads is $40,000. Pay at the high end of the scale averages $54,000, while workers at the lower end earn about $30,000. Job performance bonuses can boost salary an additional $500 to $7,000, and profit-sharing averages $1,400.

The job outlook for team leads through 2026 is average. Candidates with advanced customer service skills and experience with multiple computer software applications have the best prospects in this field.

 

Helpful Resources

Below we’ve researched and compiled a list of resources that can get you started on your way in the call center industry:

National Association of Call Centers – founded in 2005, this nonprofit’s mission is to “unite call centers, promote and maintain high standards of practice, develop and improve the education of its members, and encourage cordial relations between call centers.” NACC offers prospective members three levels of membership and provides access to industry reports and research, podcasts, consultations, and advertising opportunities

Contact Center Network Group – CCNG’s purpose is to spread knowledge among contact center peers. This goal is accomplished through various scheduled events, including an annual executive summit. This conference draws together thought and executive leaders from first-class organizations across various industries and focuses on how to improve the customer experience

Call Center Rocket Science: 110 Tips to Creating a World Class Customer Service Organization – author Randy Rubingh’s guide offers practical advice and knowledge on subjects such as recruiting, hiring, day-to-day operations, management techniques, and call center statistics. Hands-on roleplaying activities are included with the 110 tips listed in the book

Call Center: A Focus on Customer Service – Gwen Oglesby draws on her lengthy career in the customer service industry to educate and empower current and prospective call center employees. She incorporates helpful tips, personal experiences, philosophies, self-analysis, and thoughtful questions to help readers to develop a picture of what a productive, efficient, and healthy call center looks like

 

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