Business Coordinator Job Description

Business coordinators make companies run smoother. As the name implies, they coordinate efforts to help the flow of business operations. Different departments depend on them to be a central source of information and to keep each unit up-to-date on the activities of the others. For large companies that maintain various sites, each location may have a business coordinator in each specific area, such as financial services or human resources. These various business coordinators stay in touch with colleagues serving in the same capacity at other branches to share information and provide consistency.

Business coordinators generally work full-time, standard hours in an office, though overtime may be necessary as deadlines approach. Some travel may be required to meet with vendors or attend conferences. Any industry that needs help keeping everyone on track may employ a business coordinator.

 

Business Coordinator Duties and Responsibilities 

To accomplish their goal of helping departments coordinate what they do, business coordinators take on a variety of tasks. From our analysis of job postings, here are some of the core responsibilities to expect in this position:

Maintaining Financial Records

Business coordinators record and monitor information that multiple departments may need to see. For instance, they may keep track of expenditures for office supplies and let each department know what is left in the yearly budget. When numbers are off, business coordinators may do an audit to see where problems are occurring. They also may assume responsibility for payroll, issuing checks, and reconciling accounts receivable/accounts payable.

Providing Consistency

Instead of each department handling things its own way, business coordinators work to create a common framework. For example, they may develop standardized forms with which to submit business expenses. Allowing operations to be more orderly and streamlined, this conformity also limits accusations of certain departments receiving preferential treatment.

Administrative Support

Business coordinators may be called upon to handle administrative tasks that involve multiple sectors of the company. For instance, they may make travel arrangements for people from various departments to attend a conference. They may sort general mail and determine the best person or unit within the company to give it to, resolve service and equipment issues, and design company correspondence templates. If a meeting involves leaders from various divisions, a business coordinator may arrange the day, time, place, and agenda.

Customer Service

When a client has a concern, the business coordinator may act as the go-between. Thorough knowledge of the workings of each department enables the business coordinator to judge who would be the best to tackle the complaint. And if the situation requires the efforts of various departments, the business coordinator talks with each to see the problem through to resolution.

 

Business Coordinator Skills

Business coordinators are superior organizers who can handle and make sense of input coming from various directions. As outstanding communicators, they keep colleagues from multiple departments in the loop so that company activities move along smoothly. Other traits that impress hiring managers when they look at candidates for business coordinator positions include:

  • Attending to detail so that information does not slip through the cracks
  • Multitasking with ease and adjusting as new demands are added
  • Exhibiting a calm, can-do attitude to ease any tensions between departments and promote shared goals
  • Following directions from multiple leaders

 

Business Coordinator Tools of the trade

People interested in becoming business coordinators should familiarize themselves with the following:

  • Computers – to write letters and emails, prepare reports, and perform other basic tasks; proficiency in Microsoft Word is especially helpful
  • Phones –for both internal and external communication
  • Calculators – to perform financial computations
  • Expense reports – detailed lists of money spent by an individual or department

 

Business Coordinator Education and Training

Business coordinators usually possess an associate or bachelor’s degree in business or a related field. Many begin their careers as administrative assistants and assume more responsibility over time, being promoted to the business coordinator position.

 

Business Coordinator Resources

If you’re interested in polishing the skills necessary to land a job as a business coordinator, these books may be of interest:

Perfect Phrases for Office Professionals: Hundreds of Ready-to-Use Phrases for Getting Respect, Recognition and Results in Today’s Workplace – Effective communication skills are a must for any business coordinator. This quick-reference guide helps business coordinators build relationships, handle complaints, get their point across, and achieve results.

Corporate Finance for Dummies – This book in the well-known series tackles often-confusing topics, such as financial statements, in easy-to-understand language. Reviewers call it “a great starting point” and “quite thorough in explanations.”

Organize Tomorrow Today: 8 Ways to Retrain Your Mind to Optimize Performance at Work and in Life – When others are depending on you to coordinate things, having your own act together is a must. Readers tout this book as “usable,” “life-changing,” and “one of the best investments I’ve made.”

The Energy Bus: 10 Rules to Fuel Your Life, Work and Team with Positive Energy – An international bestseller, this book can inspire business coordinators to be the type of employee that gets the best out of everyone in the office. Read it to be on your way to turning negative energy into positive achievement!

 

Business Coordinator Resume Help

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